14. March 2019 22:16
by Ammelia
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HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

14. March 2019 22:16 by Ammelia | 0 Comments

                 

 

If you are pregnant your eating plan needs to change because you have nutritional needs that you do not have when you are not expecting. Remember everything you eat, drink and are exposed to also affect your baby. Your unborn child gets all of its nutrients from the things you eat and if you do not have enough of a nutrient, your body may begin to supply it from its reserves. Enjoy reading our healthy food guide for pregnant women.

One example of this is calcium. If you do not consume enough calcium in your diet or through supplements, your body will supply it to your unborn child from the reserves in your body. This can make your bones and teeth weak as well as affect your nails and skin. Get the nutrients you and your unborn baby need through a diet plan that is formulated especially for pregnant women.

IMPORTANT NUTRIENTS FOR PREGNANT WOMAN

Vitamins A and E, iron, potassium and folic acid are all essential for pregnant women. While your prenatal vitamins prescribed by your doctor give you an extra boost of essential vitamins and minerals, you can not rely on them to give you complete nutrition. Nothing replaces a healthy diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein sources and whole grains. Take your prenatal vitamins, but also eat a balanced healthy diet to give you and your baby the nutrition you both need to be healthy.

Two of the most important nutrients for pregnant women are folic acid and iron. Folic acidhas been proven to help prevent neural tube defects. These are defects in your baby’s spinal cord and brain. Folic acid also helps prevent cleft lip and congenital heart disease. Iron protects you from developing anemia, a lack of red blood cells.
Iron also helps increase the oxygen transference in your bloodstream and builds red blood cells for the increased amount of blood you need in your body. Your baby also needs to store red blood cells to be used in the first few months of life.

Do not take large amounts of vitamins and minerals thinking more is better. Too much Vitamin A can cause birth defects, and be wary of herbal supplements. Herbal supplements have not been studied for their effects on unborn babies so don’t take chances. Take your prenatal vitamins as prescribed by your doctor. If you find they upset your stomach, try taking them at night or with meals.

DIETARY RECOMMENDATIONS

When you are pregnant you will give your baby a good start by eating a healthy and balanced diet. Some of the foods to include in your diet include the following which are high in the vitamins and minerals you and your baby need:

  1. Fortified cereals and fortified whole wheat bread and pasta
  2. Wheat germ
  3. Orange vegetables like carrots, sweet potatoes and pumpkin
  4. Dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale, collards, beet greens and turnip greens
  5. Winter squash
  6. Tomatoes and tomato sauces
  7. Sweet red peppers
  8. Melons like cantaloupe and honeydew
  9. Citrus fruits and juices such as oranges and red or pink grapefruit
  10. Orange fruits like mangoes and apricots
  11. Bananas
  12. Avocado
  13. Fat-free dairy products
  14. Dried beans and peas are excellent sources of protein. When served with a carbohydrate like rice they form a complete protein
  15. Lean beef, pork and chicken
  16. Shrimp, oysters, crab and clams
  17. Halibut, rainbow trout, cod, herring, rockfish, sardines and yellow fin tuna

Foods to avoid include excess sugar, caffeinated coffee and tea, soda, diet soda, alcohol and foods high in fat and cholesterol. Drink plenty of water to keep your system clean and aid in digestion and bowel movements. If you experience indigestion, consult with your doctor about the use of antacids, or try a cup of peppermint tea to settle your stomach.

PORTION CONTROL

Your doctor will more than likely tell you not to gain much weight during your pregnancy. This can be hard because you may feel hungry most of the time. Snack on healthy foods like carrot sticks and some ranch dressing, celery and peanut butter, or an apple with cream cheese or peanut butter. Pay close attention to the serving sizes of your meals. One half cup is generally the serving size of starchy vegetables and high sugar fruits. Three ounces of meat is a usually a serving, but your doctor will give you guidance about your particular caloric allowance.

Although you want to eat healthy, don’t deprive yourself of a treat now and then. A piece of cake or pie is fine as long as you stop at one piece. Many times you can have up to 300 extra calories per day. This means you can have a treat once in a while so you don’t feel like you are missing out on your favorite treats.

Eat healthy, get plenty of rest and take your prenatal vitamins and you can give your baby a healthy start to life.

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